Emma O’Reilly: Irish Rising Star (E.P. Review and Upcoming Tour)

A musician from the west of Ireland specialising in alternative rock and pop but played through the piano, Emma O’ Reilly is certainly something unique in today’s music industry. Citing influences such as Kate Bush and Tori Amos, she has been making music and performing since her early teenage years, going on to study music further, obtaining a BA from Trinity College. Her first E.P ‘Tour’ was released in 2007 and was a huge success as it completely sold out.

Emma is beginning a run of summer shows, performing this weekend in Norwich on Saturday 17th June at Eaton Park Cafe and Peterborough on Sunday 18th June at Puzzels?, then touring further with 5 more shows at the end of July/beginning of August.
Tickets are available through her Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/emmaormusic/app/123966167614127/.

Her fourth EP ‘Fractures’ was released on May 19th and has so far received critical acclaim from a variety of people such as Remy Connolly (Remy’s Film and Music Blog) and Julie Bell (Pure M Magazine).
It was named ‘Album of the Week’ by BBC Radio Suffolk on The Great Big Sunday Show and has had airplay on radio stations across Great Britain and Ireland.

‘Fractures’ Review
With the basis of her music being the piano, Emma proves that simplicity is the key to making a captivating E.P.
‘Shake’ is the lead single from ‘Fractures’ and starts the E.P off on a fierce note. The attitude and meaning of her words punch through the music, creating a huge contrast to the delicate, traditional piano. A lot of thought has gone into how the story is told, which is a refreshing change to the mundane pop that is pumped into the music charts these days.
In comparison, ‘Count’ is much gentler, with the chords of the ukulele blending beautifully with her vocal melody. It is a song which soothes you, and one of those rare songs which you instantly like upon first listen.
There is so much emotion that is put into Emma’s songs; something you can hear in her voice and which is then felt in your body. In ‘Cervantes’, Emma’s voice is almost haunting, and genuinely gave me the chills whilst listening to it. I had to pause for a moment because I was just in awe of how pure her voice was.
It is so clear through this E.P that Emma is very gifted and has perfected, very quickly, which instruments compliment her voice and help tell the songs’ story. The notes she is able to reach, especially on the last track, ‘Geneva’, are incredible and I wish I was able to do that without my voice breaking.
With Emma’s music, nothing gets lost in over-production. No value is lost in how many instruments/backing vocals are added.
 Emma O’ Reilly is a promising and dedicated musician who is serious about the music she produces and the messages she puts across in her songs. She has overcome so much and worked so hard to produces ‘Fractures’ and it is receiving the positive reviews and promotion that it deserves.

To listen to ‘Fractures’ just click these links below:

Manchester Music vs Norwich Music

Coming to the end of my first year at music uni has made me look back over the year and think about all the differences between my home city of Norwich and now my second home of Manchester. Of course there are cultural, historical and dialect differences but seeing as this is a music blog, I am going to focus and compare the Manchester music scene to the Norwich music scene.

As I said previously in my blog ‘Music in Manchester’, there are very obvious differences you notice when coming to Manchester, such as the whole cities obsession with Oasis, The Smiths and The Stone Roses. Nearly everyone here loves either one or all of these bands and honestly it’s pretty weird to experience!
Norwich doesn’t have a defining band like Oasis, it’s mainly filled with people who like all different kinds of music. That’s one thing I love about music in Norwich; you don’t feel pressured to like one particular genre/artist/band. All different kinds of bands come to Norwich, but the city isn’t really defined by one particular band or genre.

For example, from going to a music college and being friends with mainly metal-heads, I experienced that Norwich had a thriving underground heavy metal scene. Pubs like the B2 and Brickmakers and the Owl Sanctuary regularly put on gigs for local metal bands, in order to give aspiring musicians of metal- a genre which has lost some of its’ popularity in recent years- the promotion and foot on the ladder that they need.
Of course, Norwich doesn’t have nearly as many venues as Manchester and lacks a big venue like MEN Arena, the Etihad Stadium or Victoria Warehouse. The biggest venue Norwich has is the UEA, with a capacity of only 1500. So, this means that more well known bands and artists are less likely to tour to little ol’ Naar’ich. When I was younger I had to travel to Nottingham to see bands, such as My Chemical Romance, Thirty Seconds To Mars and Blink 182. Now, living in Manchester, I only need to walk to the other side of the city or down the road to see bands like these. In December, I’m lucky enough to be seeing Marilyn Manson. An artist whose music I don’t primarily listen to as much as I used to, but one who I would never pass up the opportunity to see.

Norwich also has other genres intertwined within it, such as drum and bass, folk/acoustic acts and mainstream rock. The UEA and Waterfront are venues which both regularly hold club nights that play everything from R ‘n’ B to pop punk, from underground dance to nostalgic ’emo’. However, whilst Norwich has all this going on, it unfortunately fails to stand out as a musical city. The UEA doesn’t even run a music degree.

Now, compare this to Manchester, and whilst it has the huge stereotype of being an indie music central, it is looked upon as a musically rich city. Bands actually come here, their tour manager is able to look at the city and conclude that people will attend the concert, and ALL KINDS of musicians come here because of the range of venues. Manchester Academy- just down Oxford Road- has 3 venues within it. There are 2 O2 sites (Apollo and Ritz), smaller venues for lesser known artists or uni bands such as Gorilla, Band On The Wall and Sound Control as well as the larger venues I mentioned earlier. Musicians from all over the world come and play in Manchester.

However, I do feel that some aspiring musicians/bands who come out of the uni’s and colleges here, do fall into the stereotypical indie-wannabe Arctic Monkey’s/Oasis/The Smiths, which isn’t a good sign for the cities new music scene. Manchester is a vibrant, varied city and shouldn’t be stuck on repeat, churning out indie band after indie band. What I’ve noticed whilst living here, and of course experiencing Manchester’s music scene, is that there needs to be different genres that are prevalent in Manchester. I feel that the city could really experience its dance/EDM scene more, rather than just confining it to Victoria Warehouse. It would be nice to regularly attend raves that you don’t have to fork out £40/£50 for!
Event organisers would be surprised by how many people would attend dance nights, and how many DJ’s and Producers they would be able to hire. The uni I attend has a Music Production course but currently, it’s difficult for them to spread their name further than Soundcloud, due to the lack of dance venues Manchester has. I can say definitely that having EDM venues would make this city even more attractive than it already is and would help shift the indie stereotype it’s becoming stuck with.

So that’s my comparison between Norwich and Manchester’s music scenes. Both have their faults, but I love them equally. I think if they merged together though then they would have the right balance. It’s strange to experience a city which has a strong music scene, it’s just getting used to a genre which I don’t listen to, but coming to Manchester meant I met my boyfriend, who introduced me to the amazing world of dance music and expanded my music tastes even further, which I am very grateful for.